Archives for writing prompts

#FlashPIC 55 Wild Rose #writingprompt #amwriting

Consider the symbolism of a wild rose, growing unchecked in the hedgerow. Red roses traditionally mean passion, true love and romance, but what about other colours? And how is a wild rose different? This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Explore the meanings of other coloured roses – for example, white roses mean young love, purity and are often used for bridal bouquets. Ivory roses represent charm, thoughtfulness and grace. In Victorian times, yellow roses meant jealousy. A single wild rose may mean simplicity. Choose one rose and use it as the central motif in a short story or flash fiction piece about misunderstandings. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Parking Suspension  These Feet were made for Walking  Green Chairs  What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank space. And it couldn’t be quicker. Writers’ BLOCKbusters is a collection of three ebooks of writing prompts. Why are they different? Precisely because they are short, easy to use,
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 54 Will It Hurt #writingprompt #amwriting

You are high in the air, looking down. It is a long way to the ground. Why are you there, what are you doing? Write a foot chase sequence for a book or film in which your character has no choice but to go forwards, whatever the risk. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. For inspiration, analyse chase sequences from these films:- Titanic – Jack and Rose being chased around RMS Titanic by Cal’s manservant, Spicer Lovejoy; The Pelican Brief – Darby Shaw and Gray Grantham being chased around a multi-storey car park by Stump; Police Story – this Jackie Chan film is packed with chase scenes; Bullitt – watch this not only for the car chases, but for the final foot chase as Steve McQueen and Pat Renella’s characters stalk each other across San Francisco airport; There are six steps to writing a great chase scene:- Set-up – build the suspense, tension and risk from the beginning; Build-up – make the goal important, who is chasing who, what is to be gained and lost, what risks are the chased and the chaser prepared to take; Climax – add some emotional pressure; What to leave out – the
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 53 Wheatfield after Harvest #writingprompt #amwriting

Imagine you are a teenager again, laying in a recently harvested field of wheat. Recreate those lazy hazy days of summer when school was out and days seemed endless. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Remember what it was to be a teenager when your life seems on hold, when days seem empty and infinite. Put a teenage character into this wheatfield and write a short piece in real time, minute by minute, dwelling on the slow passing of time. Not a lot may happen, the action is in the character’s thoughts – this moment, remembering something that happened, anticipating something hoped for. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Wet Leaves  Laburnum  Cable  What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank space. And it couldn’t be quicker. Writers’ BLOCKbusters is a collection of three ebooks of writing prompts. Why are they different? Precisely because they are short, easy to use, and flexible. Designed for writers of
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Categories: On Writing and Writers' BLOCKbusters.

#FlashPIC 52 A Lion on a Tube Train #writingprompt #amwriting

Today’s writing exercise considers a surreal image – the juxtaposition of the mundane and the unexpected, an unconscious expression of fantasy, of the inner world of a character. Let’s explore how the surreal can be used to hint at a character’s conscious and unconscious mind, deepening the reader’s understanding of his motivation, perhaps misleading the reader about what a character is really like. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Consider this image of an everyday scene – a train – with a dreamlike image – the lion. Is the lion really there? If it is, write an action scene of what happens next. If the lion is a figment of your character’s imagination, what in his sub-conscious makes him see the lion at this particular point in time? Is this a regular vision? Is the trigger internal or external? What does this vision say to the reader? And how can you use it to convey additional information about this character? © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Ethereal Rubbish  Anonymous People  Waiting Beneath the Clock What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t
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Categories: On Writing and Writers' BLOCKbusters.

#FlashPIC 51 Sky on Fire #writingprompt #amwriting

Changing weather is a useful technique used over and again by writers of fiction, poetry and films. It can convey atmosphere, increasing or decreasing dramatic tension, signal turning points in the story and hint at the inner world of a character. Today’s #FlashPIC is Sky on Fire. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. This is a brainstorming exercise. Consider each of the following, one at a time, and write a list of what this photograph suggests to you:- Weather, climate or environmental conditions; Atmosphere, the external feelings that come from the environment; Mood, the feeling this Sky on Fire creates in the reader; Man-made actions that could create a sky like this; A person’s instinctive actions and words, suggested by this #FlashPIC – thoughtful, considered, impulsive and rash; A character’s deeper emotions and motivations, hidden to others and perhaps unknown to the person himself – key in suggesting a conflicted character. Can you make connections between items on your different lists, what do they suggest to you? © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Rocks, as if Split by an Axe  Plastic Bag  Lion Gatepost  What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to
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Categories: On Writing and Writers' BLOCKbusters.

#FlashPIC 49 Painted Sky #writingprompt #amwriting

Today you are an artist and you will paint a picture of this sky. First work out the practicals – where are you, time of day, what is your skill level, what are your expectations. Don’t worry about the technical details of painting, your artist can use paints, pencil, crayon, charcoal, iPad apps, felt tip pens, whatever you want. Amateur or professional, it doesn’t matter, you decide. Choose a name. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Now put your mind inside your artist. Consider the sky, the shapes, the colours, the contrasts, the images it conjures in your mind, the things it makes you think of – including the odd associations you mind may jump to. Take one of these images or thought associations, and include it in your artist’s day. How does it change the painting – does the artist decide to paint something else, do something else. Perhaps someone arrives and interrupts. The sky changes – a storm approaches, a plane leaves a con trail, a noise nearby interrupts his/her concentration. What happens after this disturbance and how does your artist react? How important is the picture of the painted sky? Why is a picture of
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Categories: On Writing and Writers' BLOCKbusters.

#FlashPic 48 Wet Leaves #writingprompt #amwriting

Today you are going to prepare the place where an action scene will take place. It is a wet day, everything is dripping. It is outside, perhaps in an isolated wood, a city park, a garden. Underfoot, the fallen leaves are drenched, soggy, squelchy. Describe the sensations of the wetness – the sounds, the dripping, the raindrops, is it windy, warm or cold? Consider every point of the physical surroundings that occur to you, develop each one in detail. Think about words that recur, the overlying atmosphere of your day. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Introduce your action into this carefully imagined place. Make the place a part of the action. You have spent a lot of energy developing your place, don’t forget about it now. How can the wetness, the squelchy leaves, the dripping raindrops, affect the action? Does someone slip and fall. Are footsteps heard as someone tries to approach by stealth. Write your action scene then edit it – write one version where the place has a strong presence and affects the action lightly; write a second version where the influence of the place has a muted effect. Which do you prefer? ©
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Categories: On Writing and Writers' BLOCKbusters.

#FlashPic 47 Union Jack and Trees #writingprompt #amwriting

Central London. A special occasion. Something happens here… you decide what. First choose your year, perhaps a date from history. Now make the story your own by putting you character there. Close your eyes, imagine the time, listen to the noise, the voices, the traffic, the shouts, the whispered conversations. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. This photograph shows The Mall in London during the summer of 2012, the London Olympics. But the scene lends itself well to other landmark days in history. Using a true event as the background to a fictional story works well. Choose your true event according to your narrative and what you want to happen. If you are starting a new story, try one of these ideas as a starting point and see where it leads you:- VE Day, London – May 7, 1945 – Bring together one character mourning a loved one, and another who is celebrating the beginning of freedom from war; The Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II – June 2, 1953 – watched by a schoolchild standing at the kerb; A man who works on the building of The Mall in 1660 when King Charles II ordered a redesign of
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Categories: On Writing and Writers' BLOCKbusters.

#FlashPic 46 Tap Going Two ways #writingprompt #amwriting

Two families live side by side, cheek by jowl. They must share one tap for all their water. In this exercise, the challenge is to take a basic unexciting situation then make it dramatic by adding a mixture of character, confrontation and threat. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. First decide the setting of your tap. Perhaps it is a tap at a domestic house which, during a drought and water shortage, must be shared. Perhaps it is a water pump in a remote village. Imagine the place, the time, the century, and the circumstances requiring the sharing of water. Consider the practical difficulties, the emotional consequences. Is the water supply constant, or intermittent. Why is the water supply under threat. Now add your two families. Concentrate on two main characters but sketch out two other family members so you have the option of using them to add tension or balm to the situation. What key emotions and experiences sum up the relationship of your two protagonists? Have they met before, or are they strangers. Resentment. Community spirit. Jealousy. Pedantry. Hatred. Isolation. Shyness. Admiration. Suspicion. Pragmatism. Attraction. Decide the specific water needs of each family. Now put your
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Categories: On Writing and Writers' BLOCKbusters.

How Jacqueline Wilson writes #amwriting #writetip

Jacqueline Wilson on writers’ block: “I don’t often feel blocked, though I often worry that I’m writing rubbish.” [from ‘The Author’ magazine, Winter 2018]  Dame Jacqueline Wilson has written more than 100 books for children, which have been translated into 34 languages. It is not surprising, given her output, that she doesn’t often feel blocked. She credits this to her background as a journalist, “I worked as a magazine journalist in my late teens and had to write my allotted thousand words within an hour or I’d be in serious trouble! It was very good training. The rare times I haven’t got a clue what to write next I go for a walk or a swim.” Sound advice. What is more interesting though, is her worry that she is writing rubbish. Writers, new and experienced, face this dilemma on an almost daily basis. I don’t know if it’s reassuring that she feels this way, or depressing that it’s not a feeling you shed as you publish more books. BUY THE BOOK See how these other authors write:- AJ Pearce, on immersing herself in the 1940s  Philippa Gregory, on putting the reader into the historical moment Sebastian Barry, on writing the
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Categories: On Writing.

#FlashPIC 42 Ethereal Rubbish #writingprompt #amwriting

A plastic bag is blown along a pavement by the breeze. Use this moody scene as your trigger to start writing today. An inanimate object like this is a useful tool to use in a short story or novel. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. This plastic bag can:- Illustrate a particular theme. For example, perhaps your character is a rolling stone, always drifting, never settling in one place. Or your theme could be climate change; Reinforce a character trait. Perhaps you want to hint to the reader that a character is transparent, flimsy, without foundation. Or if your bag is paper, perhaps they are vulnerable, easily damaged and never repaired. You get the idea; Be a linking device to introduce two characters to each other. Imagine watching a film where a lonely man drops a plastic bag which is picked up by the wind. He runs to pick it up and put it in the rubbish bin, and collides with a woman who is part of a charitable litter collection scheme. If it helps, visualise this scene as if you are watching it on television; Demonstrate atmosphere. Perhaps your scene is described in black and white. The
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Categories: On Writing and Writers' BLOCKbusters.

#FlashPIC 40 Rocks, as if Split by an Axe #writingprompt #amwriting

Some huge force is at work here. Imagine the scenario… a huge rockfall in the middle of a city street. Where have the rocks come from? How did they get here? And how were they split? Is this strength mechanical, human or alien? This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Try creating a new character for this scene, rather than one of your familiar creations, and write a short story or a flash fiction exercise. Today try writing out of your familiar genre. If you usually write historical, try sci-fi or horror. If you write horror, try comedy or romance. You get the idea. Study the photograph and decide what split the rocks. Place them in a location and add your character, one or two people only. What is the conflict in the scene – perhaps an external threat to their safety, or an unexpected meeting that brings excitement, panic or stress? © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Hotel Corridor The Meaning of Purple Wordstorm Lament What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed
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Categories: On Writing and Writers' BLOCKbusters.

#FlashPIC 39 Parking Suspension #writingprompt #amwriting

Imagine arriving home to find access to your home is blocked. Parking suspended. Entry forbidden. A cordon closes the street. A police presence. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Try this picture to kickstart a short story or a flash fiction exercise about dealing with an unexpected situation. How do you feel? Irritated. Angry. Guilty. Fearful for your family, your home, your possessions. Consider the surroundings. Is there a crowd of onlookers or are you alone? Does a helicopter hover, perhaps police or news. Perhaps a fire engine or ambulance. What is your priority? What do you do? And what are the consequences of your actions? © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Freddie Mercury Wordstorm Bronze Waiting beneath the clock What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank space. And it couldn’t be quicker. Writers’ BLOCKbusters is a collection of three ebooks of writing prompts. Why are they different? Precisely because they are short, easy to use,
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Categories: On Writing and Writers' BLOCKbusters.

#FlashPIC 33 Feet Beneath the Table #writingprompt #amwriting

Two pairs of feet, and knees, and legs. Unidentified. Anonymous. Gender undetermined. What is happening here? This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Use this picture to kickstart a flash fiction story about a meeting between two people. Or use it as a dialogue exercise for your novel. They could be strangers, or lovers having an argument, or husband and wife splitting up. Or are they planning a murder? Decide on the gender of each person. Give them a name and sketch out an identity. Imagine how their voices sound when they speak. Next write some sample dialogue for each person, conducted with a stranger. The subject matter is unimportant. You should concentrate on the character’s speech pattern; is there something distinguishable about this person’s voice? An accent, a mannerism or verbal tic, foreign pronunciations? Decide on the general subject area to be discussed at the table in the photograph then make your two characters polarised in their opinions, taking opposite positions on the subject in hand. Now give them a problem to solve or a confrontation. Start writing the dialogue. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- How thirsty are you? Hotel corridor
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 32 Cutting Down Trees for Firewood #writingprompt #amwriting

During the Second World War the Tiergarten, Berlin’s popular inner city park, was made unrecognisable as the trees were chopped down and used for firewood. Here is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series. Try this picture to kickstart a flash fiction story about wartime or a decision faced by a character in your novel. Imagine three things:- 1 It is winter. There is no fuel to heat your house. You can go cold, steal, or chop down trees in a local woodland. 2 What are the consequences be? How will your family survive? 3 How does your choice affect your household? How do your neighbours react to your actions? Take these three elements and write a flash fiction story, or a character exercise. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- These feet were made for walking St James Park, polite notice Between the train seats What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank space. And it couldn’t be quicker. Writers’
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 31 Clock at Waterloo Station #writingprompt #amwriting

Time marches onwards. What if you could stop it… for a minute, for an hour? Here is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series. Try this picture to kickstart a flash fiction story or a decision faced by a character in your novel. Imagine three things. What might happen if time were to stop, to pause… for a moment, a minute, an hour, a day? What would the consequences be? How would this affect one person? Where does it happen? Does time stop just for this person, or for everyone? Take these three elements and write a flash fiction story, or a character exercise. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Beware danger from high tides beyond Moon rocks These feet were made for walking  What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank space. And it couldn’t be quicker. Writers’ BLOCKbusters is a collection of three ebooks of writing prompts. Why are they different? Precisely because they are short, easy to
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 30 How Thirsty Are You #writingprompt #writetip

Do you know how it feels to be thirsty? Really thirsty? Your mouth is dry so your lips are gummed together, the insides of your cheeks cling to your teeth. Your sharp-edged teeth cut into your tongue. You cannot count from one to five. Here is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series. Try this #writetip to kickstart a flash fiction story or a decision faced by a character in your novel. First create a world for your character. Where is he/she? Stranded on a mountain peak surrounded by rock? Adrift in a boat on the sea? On an unknown planet without a water source? In a drought when the taps run dry? Or is water available, but with-held or poisoned? Imagine severe thirst. If it helps, go without a drink for a few hours and note how you feel. Not just the physical changes, but how does it make you feel mentally? Are your thoughts as clear as usual? What is happening to your vision and your pulse rate? Now take a stressful situation, and put your thirsty character into it. What happens next? If there is a questionable water source available, what would your character do? Would he
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 29 At This Mark on the Pavement #writingprompt #amwriting

It began here… at this mark on the pavement. Where the grey pavement meets the brown pavement, just inches from the kerb. It was here that… what? Here is a writing tip from the Writers’ BLOCKbusterseries. Try this picture to kickstart a flash fiction story or a confrontation in your novel. First, set the scene. Imagine the street, is it quiet or full of traffic. Is the pavement packed with pedestrians, or is this a side street, secluded, isolated. Have you walked here before? Are you rushing, hurrying to get to a destination? Are you lost? Are you wandering, filling in time before a dentist appointment? Did you take a short cut which led somewhere you didn’t expect? What is the time of day, the month, the season? Is it sunny or raining? What is the loudest noise you can hear, and how does this make you feel? What can you smell… diesel fumes, the heady perfume of jasmine from a nearby plant, a waft of Obsession from a passing girl? What colour fills your vision… blue sky, a passing red bus, red brick buildings, grey and glass office blocks, a circle of green in the centre of a roundabout.
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Categories: On Writing and Writers' BLOCKbusters.

#FlashPIC 28 These Feet Were Made for Walking #writingprompt #amwriting

There are no two identical pairs of feet in the world. Picture someone’s feet and work out what they say about that person. Their age, their sex, their position in life, barefoot or shod, high heels or flat, boots or sandals, plain or embellished, plastic or leather, polished toenails or horny protrusions? Here is a FlashPIC writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series to help your daily writing process. These are the feet of commuters in London. They are rushing, impatient, purposeful, late. If you have an existing character, simply think of their feet. If not, consider the circumstances of the photo and put a new character into the jostle and impatience of the morning commute to work. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Stairs to Who Knows Where Deckchairs Orange Railings What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank space. And it couldn’t be quicker. Writers’ BLOCKbusters is a collection of three ebooks of writing prompts. Why are
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 11 Red sign ‘Pedestrians’ Go! #writingprompt #amwriting

Red means warning. Use this writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series to inspire you today, or to kickstart a flash fiction short story. Use one of these phrases in your first paragraph, using the photo for inspiration. Red light means Stop. Green light means Go. “I’m confused.” He knew it wasn’t the right sign, but there wasn’t another sign to use. So he did what he was told. “Not there, you wally. If you put the sign there, the people are all gonna walk over the ….” “Some joker’s left it there, haven’t they. That arrow points at the wall. That can’t be right… can it?’ John could see a red blur about a metre ahead and, erring on the side of caution, as always, he tapped the red thing with his cane. It sounded metallic. Not for the first time, he missed Petra. She felt her front wheel fall into nothingness, the pavement disappeared, and as her bike fell forwards, the red sign fell into the hole on top of her head. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Anonymous People Arrivals Board Belisha Beacon What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.