Archives for story

My Porridge & Cream read: Julie Ryan

Today I’m delighted to welcome romantic suspense novelist Julie Ryan. Her ‘Porridge & Cream’ read is The Magus by John Fowles. “My ‘Porridge & Cream’ book that has served me well over the years is The Magus by John Fowles. I first came across this book whilst I was a student although it had been written much earlier in the 1960s. I was immediately transported to a remote Greek island as I followed Nick Urfe’s journey. John Fowles vividly portrays the magic and mystery of Greece that must have resonated with me as my first job after graduating was as a language teacher in Greece and thus began my lifelong love affair with the country. “Whenever I need to recapture those halycon days of my youth, I pick up the book for some instant sunshine; a great pick-me-up during the British winter. It doesn’t matter how many times I read this book, I always find something new in it to surprise me. To some people, it may seem a bit dated now but I just love the language and the sense of place as well as the way the millionaire plays with Nicolas’s mind until it becomes more than a game and a
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Categories: Book Love and Porridge & Cream.

#Flashfortnight… Movies

The theme for the fourth day of #Flash Fortnight was Movies. A passenger steps into Jarek’s black cab and enters a world of movies and double-meanings. Click here to read Movies for free at Ether. If you enjoy the story, please leave a review. #Flash Fortnight is a competition for very short stories – ie ‘in a flash’ fiction of up to 500 words – so last week I wrote a story a day. Each day, organiser Etherbooks announced a different theme. The first week was about writing the stories, this week we release the stories to the world. Click here to read my other stories:- Beginnings Revenge Celebration Coming tomorrow… Home.   To read Ether’s selection of short stories, flash fiction, non-fiction and essays to your mobile or tablet,  click here to download the app at iTunes or GooglePlay. Follow all the Twitter gossip about #flashfortnight and discover new writers using the hashtag or by following me @SandraDanby and @Etherbooks
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Categories: My Flash Fiction.

Book Review: The Little House

Ruth’s story starts with Sunday lunch at the in-laws and builds slowly, pulling you in relentlessly until you can’t put the book down. It is deceptive in its simplicity, at various points in the story I found myself thinking ‘but they couldn’t do that’ or ‘that would never happen.’ But it does and you believe it. The denouement is startling. This is very different from the historical novels by Philippa Gregory but shares the same aspects of a pageturner: you simply want to know what happens next. Read my review of The Lady of the Rivers by Philippa Gregory. ‘The Little House’ by Philippa Gregory [UK: Harper]   If you like ‘The Little House’, try:- ‘The Past’ by Tessa Hadley ‘Lord John and the Private Matter’ by Diana Gabaldon ‘The Knife with the Ivory Handle’ by Cynthia Bruchman And if you’d like to tweet a link to THIS post, here’s my suggested tweet: THE LITTLE HOUSE by @PhilippaGBooks #books via @SandraDanby http://wp.me/p5gEM4-oN
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Categories: Book Love.

New books coming soon….

Three new novels from fantasy writer Joe Abercrombie. The first, Half a King, will be published by Harper Collins next year and is a coming-of-age tale aimed at young readers. It is the story of Yarvi, youngest son of a warlike king, and is set in an alternative historical world akin to the Dark Ages. Yarvi, born with a crippled hand, cannot live up to his father’s expectations. The three new novels are standalone stories, but are inter-connected and aimed at 12-16 year olds.   The Judas Scar by Amanda Jennings will be published in June 2014 by Cutting Edge Press. Her debut novel, Sworn Secret, published by Canvas, has high ratings on Goodreads as a difficult and emotional read leaving some readers in tears. Faber will publish Hanif Kureishi’s new novel in February 2014. The Last Word tells the story of Mamoon, an Indian writer in his seventies, based in England, who faces falling book sales and a wife with expensive tastes. Harry, a young biographer, commissioned to write a book which will revitalise Mamoon’s sales, prompting a struggle to tell the truth. Later this year a film will be released, written by Kureishi, called Le Weekend and starring
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Categories: Book Love.

If books were food, ‘The Colour’ would be…

…an honest lunch of vintage cheddar, crusty bread and a pickled onion prepared by Harriet Blackstone from The Colour by Rose Tremain. I like strong heroines and Harriet is certainly is one, living through the New Zealand Gold Rush in the 1860s. Making a life in a strange, inhospitable land, Harriet, with her husband Joseph and her mother-in law, do not start afresh as intended but bring with them from England their old emotional baggage. The discovery of gold, ‘the colour,’ impacts on their basic lifestyle and the dynamics of their relationships in a way that none could forsee. Harriet’s mental and physical strength make her a heroine to read and re-read. She is like a traditional Somerset Cheddar: creamy, tangy, fulfilling, a salty edge to cut the creaminess. ‘The Colour’ by Rose Tremain [UK: Vintage] And if you’d like to tweet a link to THIS post, here’s my suggested tweet: Imagine, if books were food: THE COLOUR by Rose Tremain #books http://wp.me/p5gEM4-jc via @SandraDanby
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Categories: Book Love and If books were food....

I can’t write without…checking my emails

… checking my emails and updating my blogs first. Then I start writing. I know lots of other writers say they find doing emails distracting, but for me I need to get them out of the way before I feel free to write. I write every day, that’s the discipline of journalism deep in my bones. Each to his own. And if you’d like to tweet a link to THIS post, here’s my suggested tweet: I can’t write without… checking my emails first #amwriting http://wp.me/p5gEM4-hg via @SandraDanby
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Categories: On Writing.

If books were real, Jo March…

Jo March … would write in an unruled Moleskine notebook with a HB sharpened pencil.   ‘Little Women’ by Louisa M Alcott [UK: Scholastic] How would other fictional characters behave, if they were real? Miss Marple in ‘The Body in the Library’ Bella Swan, human, in ‘Twilight’ Jean Brodie in ‘The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie’ And if you’d like to tweet a link to THIS post, here’s my suggested tweet: If #books were real, Jo March would write in a notebook by @moleskine LITTLE WOMEN by Louisa May Alcott via @SandraDanby http://wp.me/p5gEM4-a8
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Categories: Book Love and If books were real....