Archives for Ernest Hemingway

Great Opening Paragraph 121… ‘For Whom the Bell Tolls’ #amwriting #FirstPara

“He lay flat on the brown, pine-needled floor of the forest, his chin on his folded arms, and high overhead the wind blew in the tops of the pine trees. The mountainside sloped gently where he lay; but below it was steep and he could see the dark of the oiled road winding through the pass. There was a stream alongside the road and far down the pass he saw a mill beside the stream and the falling water of the dam, white in the summer sunlight.” ‘For Whom the Bell Tolls’ by Ernest Hemingway BUY Try one of these 1st paras & discover a new author:- ‘Queen Camilla’ by Sue Townsend 90 ‘Sacred Hearts’ by Sarah Dunant 10 ‘Jack Maggs’ by Peter Carey 76 And if you’d like to tweet a link to THIS post, here’s my suggested tweet: FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS by Ernest Hemingway #amwriting https://wp.me/p5gEM4-3JG via @SandraDanby
Read More

Categories: Book Love.

Great Opening Paragraph 83… ‘The Old Man and the Sea’ #amwriting #FirstPara

“He was an old man who fished alone in a skiff in the Gulf Stream, and he had gone eighty-four days now without taking a fish. In the first forty days a boy had been with him. But after forty days without a fish the boy’s parents had told him that the old man was now definitely and finally salao, which is the worst form of unlucky, and the boy had gone at their orders in another boat which caught three good fish the first week. It made the boy sad to see the old man come in each day with his skiff empty and he always went down to help him carry either the coiled lines or the gaff and harpoon and the sail that was furled around the mast. The sail was patched with flour sacks and, furled, it looked like the flag of permanent defeat.” ‘The Old Man and the Sea’ by Ernest Hemingway Amazon Try one of these 1st paras & discover a new author:- ‘I’ll Take You There’ by Joyce Carol Oates ‘The Impressionist’ by Hari Kunzru ‘That They May Face the Rising Sun’ by John McGahern And if you’d like to tweet a link to
Read More

Categories: Book Love and On Writing.

I agree with… Truman Capote

Truman Capote “Work is the only device I know of. Writing has laws of perspective, of light and shade, just as painting does, or music. If you are born knowing them, fine. If not, learn them. Then rearrange the rules to suit yourself. Even Joyce, our most extreme disregarder, was a superb craftsman; he could write Ulysses because he could write Dubliners. Too many writers seem to consider the writing of short stories as a kind of finger exercise. Well, in such cases, it is certainly only their fingers they are exercising.” [in an interview with The Paris Review, 1957] He talks like a journalist. Just do it, write, get on with it, stop fussing. Other journalists turned novelists say the same thing, learn the rules, break the rules, just write it. Other truisms from Capote include: “Finishing a book is just like you took a child out in the back yard and shot it.” “Life is a moderately good play with a badly written third act.” Ernest Hemingway, another former journalist, has some of the best quotes about ‘getting on with it’:- “There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.” “Do
Read More

Categories: Book Love and On Writing.