Archives for copy-editing

Another ‘best of’ mention, but with a difference

At this time of year it seems as if every blog, Twitter and Facebook account is full of ‘Best of…’ lists: favourite books read, books to read this year, films watched, films to watch in 2015. Happily Ignoring Gravity is featured on another list, but this is a list with a difference. It is a list compiled by professional copy editor Fiction Feedback which reads hundreds of manuscripts a year. Fiction Feedback says Ignoring Gravity is “a book about identity, and about why who you are makes a difference, whether you want it to or not.” To read the full article about Fiction Feedback’s top five books, click here.     ‘Ignoring Gravity’ by Sandra Danby [UK: Beulah Press] Buy now And if you’d like to tweet a link to THIS post, here’s my suggested tweet: IGNORING GRAVITY: about why who you are makes a difference @DeaWriter http://wp.me/p5gEM4-1t7 via @SandraDanby #books
Read More

Categories: Book Love and My Novel: 'Ignoring Gravity'.

The copy-editing experience

This is an unusually long post from me today, as I want to write about copy-editing. One thing I wasn’t prepared for when preparing the manuscript (MS) of Ignoring Gravity for publication was copy-editing. This was something I just hadn’t got around to organising.It wasn’t that I didn’t know it would have to be edited, but I hadn’t factored in the time needed. The novel has been read so many times, in its many forms and with its different titles, by so many different people, surely copy-editing is just picking up bad punctuation? Wrong. I am so thankful that a journalist colleague now runs a copy-editing business. Dea Parkin [below] and I go back a long way, I trust her. Fiction Feedback gave me a brilliant service. I heard Dea gulp when I said she had a week to turn around the MS, and another gulp when I said it was 99,000 [alright, 100,000] word MS. But she did it. In fact we did have more time, and in the end Fiction Feedback read the MS three times. It was worth every penny. On all style points, Fiction Feedback refers to the Oxford English Dictionary, and New Hart’s Rules. The
Read More

Categories: On Writing.

Applying the rules of art to writing: eliminate the non-essential

“Every work of art should contain whatever it needs to fulfil its descriptive objective but nothing more. Look at the ‘leftover’ parts of every composition. Successful images have no dead spaces or inactive parts. Look at your compositions holistically and make sure that every element advances the purposes of the whole.” Excerpt from ‘101 Things to Learn in Art School’ by Kit White  Every writer has over-written, been carried away with a sub-plot that leads nowhere, given a character its head and let it run away from the plot. When I was writing my first novel Ignoring Gravity, I read an interview with a novelist who recommended asking yourself of a chapter or passage you’ve just written: ‘But what does it do? How does it progress the story?’ If you don’t know, stop and consider. If you do know and it is taking the story in a different direction, you don’t necessarily have to stop, just be aware of what you are doing. There is an argument that says continue writing, that the diversion may be better than the original idea, that the diversion may turn into book two, or a completely different novel unrelated to the first. It is
Read More

Categories: On Writing.