Archives for Writing exercises

#FlashPIC #58 Abandoned Car Park #writingprompt #amwriting

In every city and town there is an abandoned corner of ground, home only to weeds, rubbish and foxes. Take this setting and make something happen here. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Explore the atmosphere of this plot, isolated in a busy place, surrounded by roads and railway, as people live their daily lives nearby, the city juxtaposition of wealth/dereliction. Consider how the mood of the place changes – from winter to summer, daytime to night-time. Is it forgotten by the local community? What used to be here and why is it abandoned? What differences are there if you consider this setting first in black and white, and separately in colour. What changes? How is the mood affected? Does this affect the tone of your planned story? © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Will it Hurt  Tap Going Two Ways Beware Danger from High Tides Beyond What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank
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Categories: Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 57 Winter Sky #writingprompt #amwriting

Looking up to the sky on the kind of winter’s day when you want to be outside, wrapped up warm, breathing the chill air deep into your lungs, can be uplifting. Experiment with capturing this feeling, write notes, take photographs, research the weather conditions, so you can use it for the setting for a future story. This writing prompt is from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Concentrate on writing about atmosphere, your perception of the day, the weather, how it makes you feel. This prompt is not about character or plot. Describe the contrast of cold air in your lungs and warm sun on your face. The woolly hat on your head. The heavy boots on your feet. The tingle of frost on your cheeks. The need for sunglasses. What emotions do you feel? How do you see others react to the beautiful weather? Think about how a winter’s day can look like a day in summer, except for the difference in temperature and the trees bare of leaves. Explore all aspects of this winter’s day as the setting for a future short story. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Union Jack & trees Parking
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Categories: Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 56 Could She Climb to the Next Balcony #writingprompt

This is a dramatic situation. Someone is considering climbing onto the next balcony. Why? Where is she? Will she do it or not? This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Follow these four steps:- Decide on the tone of your piece: dramatic action, or contemplative; What is the motivation of your character – excitement, rebellion, escape, boredom, futility, a youthful dare, a drunken error of judgement; Describe the setting, the building, the height above the ground; Populate your scenario with other characters, or none; Consider the risk. Turn this into a short story. Now experiment with motivation. Write separate stories for new characters with different reasons for climbing to the next balcony. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- The Meaning of Purple These Feet were made for Walking Cranes on the Skyline What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank space. And it couldn’t be quicker. Writers’ BLOCKbusters is a collection of three ebooks of writing
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Categories: Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 55 Wild Rose #writingprompt #amwriting

Consider the symbolism of a wild rose, growing unchecked in the hedgerow. Red roses traditionally mean passion, true love and romance, but what about other colours? And how is a wild rose different? This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Explore the meanings of other coloured roses – for example, white roses mean young love, purity and are often used for bridal bouquets. Ivory roses represent charm, thoughtfulness and grace. In Victorian times, yellow roses meant jealousy. A single wild rose may mean simplicity. Choose one rose and use it as the central motif in a short story or flash fiction piece about misunderstandings. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Parking Suspension  These Feet were made for Walking  Green Chairs  What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank space. And it couldn’t be quicker. Writers’ BLOCKbusters is a collection of three ebooks of writing prompts. Why are they different? Precisely because they are short, easy to use,
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 54 Will It Hurt #writingprompt #amwriting

You are high in the air, looking down. It is a long way to the ground. Why are you there, what are you doing? Write a foot chase sequence for a book or film in which your character has no choice but to go forwards, whatever the risk. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. For inspiration, analyse chase sequences from these films:- Titanic – Jack and Rose being chased around RMS Titanic by Cal’s manservant, Spicer Lovejoy; The Pelican Brief – Darby Shaw and Gray Grantham being chased around a multi-storey car park by Stump; Police Story – this Jackie Chan film is packed with chase scenes; Bullitt – watch this not only for the car chases, but for the final foot chase as Steve McQueen and Pat Renella’s characters stalk each other across San Francisco airport; There are six steps to writing a great chase scene:- Set-up – build the suspense, tension and risk from the beginning; Build-up – make the goal important, who is chasing who, what is to be gained and lost, what risks are the chased and the chaser prepared to take; Climax – add some emotional pressure; What to leave out – the
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPic 45 Railway Line Under Bridge #writingprompt #amwriting

This exercise is about two paths crossing unexpectedly. Two people, who know each other but do not know where the other is today, will be in the same place at the same time. This meeting has consequences for both of them. The idea of two paths running in parallel is echoed by the railway tracks, running separately in the same direction, remaining exactly the same distance apart. When you make these two people meet, your railway imagery should follow suit. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. First decide how to use the railway in your story. Where does the action take place – on the bridge, on the platform, beside the railway tracks. Is this the story about a railway accident, a journey by train, or a story of unrequited love. Who are your two characters and what is keeping them apart today? Which key emotions sum up their relationship? Secrecy. Shyness. Stubborness. Emotional blindness. Unfulfilled passion. Disguised hatred. Envy. Jealousy. Concentrate on the railway imagery and how it might lend itself to your story. Two railway tracks, strong, unbending, no diversion, a single focus. A timetable, supposedly fixed but truthfully varying from the schedule and subject to
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Categories: Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 44 Green Chairs #writingprompt #amwriting

Some stage sets are minimal, no furniture, no accessories, which has the effect of concentrating the audience’s attention on character. Consider these two green chairs in the same way and stage a scene here. This may be a complete story, or a scene from a larger work. Remember, if something is not shown in this picture you may not use it. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. There are two chairs, which implies two characters. But what happens if you add a third person, someone who cannot sit down? How does the choice of two chairs and the conversations about them show the nature of the relationship of your characters. Are they strangers, being bullying, or polite? Perhaps they are a couple with a former partner. Or three siblings with hidden resentments. Consider how each of them in turn reacts to the shortage of one chair. Now decide on the dynamics between the three people before your story starts. Map out how this changes between them as the scene progresses. And what is the finishing point? Finally sketch out the context for the meeting. Is it accidental or pre-arranged. Are they in a quiet corner or a busy
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Categories: Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 43 A Tree Alone #writingprompt #amwriting

A single tree on the horizon. It’s an enigmatic setting. This exercise is about how setting can add to the context of your story, adding layers of complexity and mood. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. First, decide what you want the tree to symbolise. Is it a meeting place, the place of a confrontation for your rights, a liaison with a lover, a battle? Write a paragraph, a page or however much you need, to work out the details. Give the tree some history, a legend, a rumour. Is treasure buried there? Was a murder committed beneath its branches? Is it a portal to a different world? Do its leaves have magical powers? Work out how your description of the tree can add to the story. Consider all parts of the tree, its roots, branches, leaves, in all four seasons, in different weather. Choose the species of tree – deciduous or evergreen, young or old – and think about this can add hints about your theme. This is not a story about a tree. It is a story in which a tree features. You just need to decide how to use the tree to help you tell
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Categories: Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 38 Laburnum #writingprompt #amwriting

This is a photograph of a laburnum tree and it is going to inspire you to write a scary story today. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series. Try this picture to kickstart a short story or a flash fiction exercise about fear. First, seven facts about the laburnum tree:- The common nickname for the laburnum tree is the ‘golden chain’ or ‘golden shower’ tree. All parts of it are poisonous. The yellow flowers are pea-shaped, resembling but unrelated to the pea family. The fruit develops as a pod that is extremely poisonous. The wood is highly prized for making musical instruments. The heartwood of the laburnum is hard, chocolate brown-coloured, and often used as a substitute for ebony or rosewood. The outer, or sapwood, is a pale butter-yellow shade. Now consider each of these facts in turn, and write one paragraph about each in a fictional setting. Consider how each fact could be threatening. Review your paragraphs and look for links between them. Discard any that don’t fit. Now turn your remaining paragraphs into a flash fiction story including one of the following:- A poisoning; A miraculous healing; An unexpected musical triumph; A piece of furniture made from
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 37 Departures Board #writingprompt #amwriting

Imagine the following then start to write. You are eight years old. You are trying to find your way home to your parents. Reading is not one of your strong points. You look at this Departures Board and wonder which train to take. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series. Try this picture to kickstart a short story or a series of flash fiction exercises about narrative. Put yourself in the mind of an eight-year old. Alone at a large noisy railway station. You becomes he or she. He has run away from the place he had been taken to live. He wants to be with his parents. Take each of the above sentences one at a time and write your way into the scenario. This may take five paragraphs or five pages, the length doesn’t matter. Give your character a name. Decide where he has come from, and what happened there. Where is his home? What matters to him in his life? What is his favourite meal? Has he been on a train before? How does the station make him feel? Now write each individual part of the story in linear order: why he left his parents and his home;
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 36 Lion Gatepost #writingprompt #amwriting

A lion sits atop a gatepost. Is it a guardian? A shapeshifter? An enemy? An ornament made of stone? This is a writing tip from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series. Beat writers’ block today with this picture. Put down your pen and set aside your laptop. Study this photograph for one minute and memorise as many details as you can. Now, in one minute, write a list of what you remember. Choose a minimum of three and a maximum of five things from your list. Write a further paragraph about each. Remember to include emotions, descriptions, sensations, anticipations. Choose one of these three paragraphs, and write it the opposite way round. If it is happy make it sad, if it is threatening make it friendly. Now make the lion come alive and walk into your story. What happens next? Start writing. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Moon rocks Arrivals Board Is it red or is it orange What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 35 Leaves on the Footpath #writingprompt #amwriting

Imagine being an alien, a foreigner in a strange land. Forget what you know. Open your mind to the new. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series, designed for all writers of fiction, novels, short stories and flash fiction. Try this picture to kickstart an exercise about observation. Study this photograph and consider where you are standing. Survey your surroundings. Smell the air. Listen. Compare your observations with your own world. Write one paragraph describing your own world for each of the following. Temperature. Climate. Surroundings. Scents. Seasons. Sounds. Repeat this exercise for where you stand now on this footpath. Now choose three details from the photograph and describe them in the language of a person from your alien world. Consider their purpose in this world. For example, consider the loose green shapes at your feet. How are they different from the small pale shapes beside them? And why is one part of the footpath darker than the other? Are you seeing in colour, or black and white? Now you have built a small world for this alien footpath, consider turning it into a flash fiction story. For that, you need action. Choose one of these three actions:- A
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 34 Is It Red Or Is It Orange #writingprompt #amwriting

Two people. Two opposing views. Consider a pair of lovers, a marriage, or two lifelong friends. Each has one strong conviction, which the other hates. So far apart are their views on this subject that they would disagree simply on a point of principle. Unblock your writers’ block with this writing tip from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series. Write a short story or an exercise about contextual layers. Consider your couple. How could their polarisation affect a mundane squabble? For example, is this geranium red, or is it orange? Choose your two characters and their existing relationship. Decide on the conviction of each, and the opposing argument of the other partner. Establish whether they still love each other, or is their relationship fracturing? Now consider their domestic daily life. Choose an everyday irritation and make them argue. Start writing the dialogue, multi-layered; the spoken disagreement concerns the everyday irritation, the unspoken text is about their polarised opinions. Wind up the tension until one, or both of them, explodes. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Cable Anonymous people Cutting down the trees for firewood What are‘ Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 33 Feet Beneath the Table #writingprompt #amwriting

Two pairs of feet, and knees, and legs. Unidentified. Anonymous. Gender undetermined. What is happening here? This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. Use this picture to kickstart a flash fiction story about a meeting between two people. Or use it as a dialogue exercise for your novel. They could be strangers, or lovers having an argument, or husband and wife splitting up. Or are they planning a murder? Decide on the gender of each person. Give them a name and sketch out an identity. Imagine how their voices sound when they speak. Next write some sample dialogue for each person, conducted with a stranger. The subject matter is unimportant. You should concentrate on the character’s speech pattern; is there something distinguishable about this person’s voice? An accent, a mannerism or verbal tic, foreign pronunciations? Decide on the general subject area to be discussed at the table in the photograph then make your two characters polarised in their opinions, taking opposite positions on the subject in hand. Now give them a problem to solve or a confrontation. Start writing the dialogue. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- How thirsty are you? Hotel corridor
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 32 Cutting Down Trees for Firewood #writingprompt #amwriting

During the Second World War the Tiergarten, Berlin’s popular inner city park, was made unrecognisable as the trees were chopped down and used for firewood. Here is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series. Try this picture to kickstart a flash fiction story about wartime or a decision faced by a character in your novel. Imagine three things:- 1 It is winter. There is no fuel to heat your house. You can go cold, steal, or chop down trees in a local woodland. 2 What are the consequences be? How will your family survive? 3 How does your choice affect your household? How do your neighbours react to your actions? Take these three elements and write a flash fiction story, or a character exercise. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- These feet were made for walking St James Park, polite notice Between the train seats What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank space. And it couldn’t be quicker. Writers’
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 31 Clock at Waterloo Station #writingprompt #amwriting

Time marches onwards. What if you could stop it… for a minute, for an hour? Here is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series. Try this picture to kickstart a flash fiction story or a decision faced by a character in your novel. Imagine three things. What might happen if time were to stop, to pause… for a moment, a minute, an hour, a day? What would the consequences be? How would this affect one person? Where does it happen? Does time stop just for this person, or for everyone? Take these three elements and write a flash fiction story, or a character exercise. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Beware danger from high tides beyond Moon rocks These feet were made for walking  What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank space. And it couldn’t be quicker. Writers’ BLOCKbusters is a collection of three ebooks of writing prompts. Why are they different? Precisely because they are short, easy to
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 30 How Thirsty Are You #writingprompt #writetip

Do you know how it feels to be thirsty? Really thirsty? Your mouth is dry so your lips are gummed together, the insides of your cheeks cling to your teeth. Your sharp-edged teeth cut into your tongue. You cannot count from one to five. Here is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series. Try this #writetip to kickstart a flash fiction story or a decision faced by a character in your novel. First create a world for your character. Where is he/she? Stranded on a mountain peak surrounded by rock? Adrift in a boat on the sea? On an unknown planet without a water source? In a drought when the taps run dry? Or is water available, but with-held or poisoned? Imagine severe thirst. If it helps, go without a drink for a few hours and note how you feel. Not just the physical changes, but how does it make you feel mentally? Are your thoughts as clear as usual? What is happening to your vision and your pulse rate? Now take a stressful situation, and put your thirsty character into it. What happens next? If there is a questionable water source available, what would your character do? Would he
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 28 These Feet Were Made for Walking #writingprompt #amwriting

There are no two identical pairs of feet in the world. Picture someone’s feet and work out what they say about that person. Their age, their sex, their position in life, barefoot or shod, high heels or flat, boots or sandals, plain or embellished, plastic or leather, polished toenails or horny protrusions? Here is a FlashPIC writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbuster series to help your daily writing process. These are the feet of commuters in London. They are rushing, impatient, purposeful, late. If you have an existing character, simply think of their feet. If not, consider the circumstances of the photo and put a new character into the jostle and impatience of the morning commute to work. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Stairs to Who Knows Where Deckchairs Orange Railings What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank space. And it couldn’t be quicker. Writers’ BLOCKbusters is a collection of three ebooks of writing prompts. Why are
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 27 Push Button at Pedestrian Crossing #writingprompt #amwriting

How do you get the reader to turn the next page of your novel or short story? There’s a great quote about this by English author Charles Reade, author of The Cloister and the Hearth, about this: “Make ‘em laugh; make ‘em cry; make ‘em wait.” As part of the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series, here is a FlashPIC writing prompt to help you write a flash fiction story about waiting, either yourself or making someone else wait, and the nature of delay. Decide what happens next. Who pushes the button? What happens? Does that person witness something? Perhaps the person doesn’t stop to push the button, why? Think of your own five possibilities. Now work each idea into a paragraph outline for a short story. Choose one idea and calculate your beginning, middle and end. Write a short story of your chosen length. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Moon Rocks Anonymous People Beach What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#FlashPIC 26 Beware Danger From High Tides Beyond #writingprompt #amwriting

This photograph is a short story waiting to be written. A woman and a child collect shells on a beach. Beside them, a sign warns of the dangers of high tides. From the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series, here is a FlashPIC writing prompt to help you write a short story, a brief flash fiction piece of only a few words, or something longer. You choose. Consider what might happen next. Write a list of five possibilities. Now work each idea into a paragraph outline for a short story. Choose one idea and calculate your beginning, middle and end. Write a short story of your chosen length. © ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’ by Sandra Danby Want more inspiration? Try these other FlashPICs:- Two Empty Glasses Feet Train Window What are ‘Writers’ BLOCKbusters’? I want to help you put words on the page. Those words won’t necessarily be the first line of your novel, or indeed anything to do with your novel, but they will be words to fill that intimidating blank space. And it couldn’t be quicker. Writers’ BLOCKbusters is a collection of three ebooks of writing prompts. Why are they different? Precisely because they are short, easy to use, and flexible. Designed for writers
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Categories: On Writing, Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.