Archives for Family history research

Long Lost Family: Denise’s story

This adoption story from the 1960s belongs to a teenager whose father died when she was 15. Missing her father and growing apart from her mother who was distracted by a new husband, she sought love and attention elsewhere. She went clubbing, and at 16 was pregnant. This is Denise Temple‘s story from the Long Lost Family television programme. The family agreed the child would be given up for adoption. But Denise remembers looking at her new born baby, Deborah: “I thought I’d die for this child, I’d die for her… I just cried and cried and cried. I said ‘I’m not giving her up’.” But her stepfather would not have her in the house. It was finally agreed that Denise and her baby could go home on the understanding that she could expect no help from her mother or stepfather. In The Sixties there was little state support for single mothers. Denise went home, and the baby slept in a drawer. She had half a dozen terry cloth nappies. “I was so alone.” She struggled on for three months, before finally giving her baby up for adoption. “It was no life for her, or me.” Denise never forgot Deborah.
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Categories: Book Love, Family history research and On Researching.

Family history: searching the bastardy records

Trawling through records is difficult enough, but when you are trying to trace an illegitimate relative it can become disheartening. More than 14,000 bastardy records held by the West Yorkshire Archive Service have been indexed and made available online at Ancestry.co.uk. The records start from 1690 up to 1914 with documents including the maintenance of illegitimate children, bastardy bonds, and warrants for apprehending errant fathers who tried to escape responsibility for their children. To explore the full database at Ancestry.co.uk, click here.   To read how my research for Ignoring Gravity took me to the Family Records Centre in North London, and what I found there, click here. ‘Ignoring Gravity’ by Sandra Danby [UK: Beulah Press] Buy now   If you want to read more about family history research, try these articles:- Did your Ancestor belong to a Trade Union? Researching children’s homes Look locally And if you’d like to tweet a link to THIS post, here’s my suggested tweet: How to find an illegitimate ancestor #familyhistory via @SandraDanby http://wp.me/p5gEM4-1xY
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Categories: Book Love, Family history research, My Novel: 'Ignoring Gravity' and On Researching.

Family history: surname research

Do you know anyone with the same surname as you? I have only ever met one other Danby, so I was curious to explore the roots of my name. As an experiment, search on Google for your surname. I did, and these were the top five entries:- The Wikipedia entry for Danby, a village in North Yorkshire, 44 miles from where I grew up. Yorkshire.com‘s tourist guide to the village of Danby Plumbing and heating engineer, B Danbys. Based in Hull, 38 miles from where I grew up. The Duke of Wellington pub in the village of Danby, North Yorkshire Local community website Esk Valley, where the village of Danby is located on the North Yorkshire Moors. So, my surname is anchored in Yorkshire. This is a light-hearted search, my next stage is to investigate the surname resources online. If you want to research your surname, click on these links here:- The Surname Society The Guild of One-Name Studies The Internet Surname Database UK BMD Select Surname List Great Britain Family Names Profiling website Just out of curiosity, I Googled Rose’s surname – Haldane- from Ignoring Gravity. Here are the top three entries of almost 2.9million results:- Architectural joinery company Haldane
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Categories: Book Love, Family history research and My Novel: 'Ignoring Gravity'.

Family history: identifying headstones

Tracing relatives – whether you are researching your family tree or on the trail of your birth family – will inevitably lead you at some point to a graveyard. Finding the headstones of relatives is always a bittersweet moment, but the text and dates may drive your search onwards.That process is now easier as 22,000 new headstone records have been added to the database at TheGenealogist.co.uk with additions of records from Buckinghamshire, Devon, Gloucestershire, Northamptonshire, Somerset, West Midlands, Wiltshire plus 12 Jersey parishes.  Each entry comprises the text of the memorial inscription, photographs of the headstone and its surroundings. Once you have identified the record you want, you can then view a map showing the graveyard location. For more information about the online headstone database, click here for TheGenealogist.co.uk. In Ignoring Gravity, Rose searches a graveyard for the headstone of her birth mother. To read how I researched that scene, click here.  Want to know more about Ignoring Gravity? Click here to watch the book trailer. ‘Ignoring Gravity’ by Sandra Danby [UK: Beulah Press] Buy now And if you’d like to tweet a link to THIS post, here’s my suggested tweet: Trying to find the headstone of a relative? Try these
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Categories: Book Love, Family history research, My Novel: 'Ignoring Gravity' and On Researching.

Book review: Seeking John Campbell

This book by John Daffurn is not fiction or a memoir. It is the true story of one man’s hunt for the family of a woman he doesn’t know, which encompasses genealogical research, foot slogging, dead ends and a lot of history. This story starts with the death of this unknown woman, Isabel Grieg, in 1995. She dies intestate. The author found her name on the Bona Vacantia list of estates without heirs. His initial research, prompted by genealogical curiosity, turned into an obsession. This book is the story of that obsession, his fascination with the Campbells and a historical account which ranges from the founding of Argentina, the establishment of a Scots colony in Argentina, through the Great War and World War Two to the present day. At times it is a very fact hungry book and I found myself re-reading some passages. This was not the book I expected, instead of an ‘Heir Hunter’ style detective story, albeit true, it is instead a well-written historical account of three men – each coincidentally called John Campbell – who may be the unknown father of Isabel Greig. In discovering the stories of these three men, the author tells the history
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Categories: Book Love and Family history research.