Book review: Butterfly Barn

Karen PowerReading this book was like sitting down with a crowd of girlfriends for a long-delayed get-together. In Butterfly Barn by Karen Power, Ireland leaps off the page, present in the speech of the characters, the scenery and the ‘feel’ of the book.

This is an easy book to read in that the pages turned quickly, but it deals with difficult topics: infant mortality, grief, betrayal, guilt. Like many Irish authors, Karen Power writes with a connection to the Catholic faith and – though I am not in the least bit religious – this did not interfere with my enjoyment of the tale. It is a women’s novel, about women, their strength, their suffering, their mutual support and above all the way they deal with what life throws at them.

On a transatlantic flight, Grace gets talking to the lady in the next seat. A friendship is forged which sees them re-united in Bayrush, Ireland, where Grace’s best friend Jessie is expecting twins. Grace is engaged to Dirk and all looks happy, until Jack – a teenage crush – returns home from Dubai.

This is the first of a series of this wide cast of characters, at times a little too wide for me. I admit to losing track of some of the more distant relations of Grace, Jessie and Kate, but I look forward to the next instalment.

For more about Karen Power’s Butterfly Barn series of books, click here for her website.

If you like ‘Butterfly Barn’, try these novels which deal with grief:-
‘The Last Days of Rabbit Hayes’ by Anna McPartlin
‘The House at the Edge of the World’ by Julia Rochester
‘Somewhere Inside of Happy’ by Anna McPartlin

‘Butterfly Barn’ by Karen Power [UK: Comeragh Publishing] Buy now

And if you’d like to tweet a link to THIS post, here’s my suggested tweet:
BUTTERFLY BARN by @kpowerauthor #bookreview via @SandraDanby http://wp.me/p5gEM4-1EO

Comments

    • sandradan1

      I do like finding a new author. Am reading William Maxwell at the moment, ‘Time will Darken It’, fantastic study of people. SD