Monthly Archives April 2020

#FlashPic 45 Railway Line Under Bridge #writingprompt #amwriting

This exercise is about two paths crossing unexpectedly. Two people, who know each other but do not know where the other is today, will be in the same place at the same time. This meeting has consequences for both of them. The idea of two paths running in parallel is echoed by the railway tracks, running separately in the same direction, remaining exactly the same distance apart. When you make these two people meet, your railway imagery should follow suit. This is a writing prompt from the Writers’ BLOCKbusters series. First decide how to use the railway in your story. Where does the action take place – on the bridge, on the platform, beside the railway tracks. Is this the story about a railway accident, a journey by train, or a story of unrequited love. Who are your two characters and what is keeping them apart today? Which key emotions sum up their relationship? Secrecy. Shyness. Stubborness. Emotional blindness. Unfulfilled passion. Disguised hatred. Envy. Jealousy. Concentrate on the railway imagery and how it might lend itself to your story. Two railway tracks, strong, unbending, no diversion, a single focus. A timetable, supposedly fixed but truthfully varying from the schedule and subject to
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Categories: Writers' BLOCKbusters and Writing exercises.

#BookReview ‘The Benefit of Hindsight’ by @susanhillwriter #crime

The Benefit of Hindsight is the tenth book in the Simon Serrailler series by Susan Hill and she covers a lot of ground. At the book’s heart, as with its predecessors, is the town of Lafferton and the Serrailler family. Crime, when it happens, affects so many people and Hill shows this effectively as more and more people are drawn into the aftermath. The themes of this book are post-traumatic-stress-disorder, pre-natal premonition and post-natal depression, art robbery and private v public healthcare. Written in a list it can seem clinical, but Hill is expert at winding together the personal lives of ordinary people so that you care about them. The continuity of the Serrailler family throughout the series adds the familiarity of real family issues that are not crime-related, just ordinary family stuff. Simon is struggling with the aftermath of his injury, not physically, but with panic attacks. His sister Cat has settled into her job with private GP service Concierge and it is Cat who meets two people central to the story; pregnant mum Carrie who unshakingly believes her baby will be born damaged; and Cindy, wife of businessman and charity supporter, Declan McDermid. When a lonely house is burgled in
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Categories: Book Love.

#BookReview ‘The Secrets We Kept’ by @laraprescott #Cold War #Pasternak

The Secrets We Kept by Lara Prescott is a mixture of Cold War thriller, romance and the true story of the publication of Dr Zhivago by Boris Pasternak. Set in the 1950s, this novel is about the power of the written word. So powerful that two nations try to outwit the other as a big new novel is set to be published; neither has any regard for the effects of their plans on the author. The two worlds are radically different, Prescott builds both convincingly. I can see Pasternak’s vegetable garden at his dacha, I can hear the typewriters in the Typing Pool at The Agency on National Mall in Washington DC. It is important to note that this is a blend of real events, real people and total fiction. Irina is American, a first generation Russian-American, her father left behind in the Soviet Union as his pregnant wife departed for a new life in America. Irina’s Mama is a dressmaker, speaking Russian to Irina at home while making elaborate dresses for Russian immigrants. Irina never meets her father. Always an outsider, when she goes for a job interview in a typing pool Marla wears a skirt made for her by Mama. She gets the job in
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Categories: Book Love.

#Bookreview ‘Hitler’s Secret’ by Rory Clements #thriller #war #WW2

Fourth in the Tom Wilde World War Two spy mysteries, Hitler’s Secret by Rory Clements hits the ground running and keeps the pages turning. The secret in question is a ten-year old girl who may or may not be the love child of Hitler. Klara has a false identity and is hidden but is now in imminent danger of exposure and murder. Wilde travels to Berlin disguised as a German-American motorcycle manufacturer in search of a business deal. His cover enables him to meet allies and search for Klara. Unsure of his mission from the beginning, Wilde imagines that everyone can see through his false identity, everyone is planning to kill him. Clements tells the story at breakneck speed, flicking from viewpoint to viewpoint. Martin Bormann, Hitler’s gatekeeper wants Klara dead and despatches a henchman, Otto Kalt. But it seems everyone touched by Klara’s story is at risk of death. As Wilde closes in on Klara’s hiding place, so do her killers. What ensues is a tense chase north across Germany towards the promised sanctuary of Sweden. And at all times it is assumed Hitler is unaware of the girl’s existence. But who else knows the secret? At the heart of this story is
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Categories: Book Love.

#Bookreview ‘On Writing’ by AL Kennedy @Writerer #amwriting #writerslife

If you want an insight into the nuts and bolts of a writer’s life, this book is for you. On Writing by AL Kennedy is a compilation of her blog posts written for The Guardian Online and essays on specific aspects of the fiction writing process. When you finish it, you will no longer believe that a writer’s life is full of glamour and applause. Kennedy’s life is hectic, mind-spinning in its variety, and inspiring. Join her on a journey as she writes one book, promotes another, teaches creative writing, gives talks and performs her ‘one woman’ show. Sympathise with her through her various debilitating illnesses – name a writer who hasn’t suffered with a bad back, as she does – and cringe as she travels on delayed trains, stays in poky B&Bs, and flies, terrified, to book signings across the world. Some of her stories made me laugh out loud. I loved the fact that she travels with a survival kit to enable her to survive unedifying overnight accommodation, including teabags and longlife food. She has learnt the hard way how to survive. Kennedy has written six novels, five story collections and two books of non-fiction, and she won
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Categories: Book Love and On Writing.

My Porridge & Cream read @Lizzie_Chantree #books #romance

Today I’m delighted to welcome romance author Lizzie Chantree.  Her ‘Porridge & Cream’ read is The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien. “My Porridge and Cream book would be The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien. I was introduced to this book by my English teacher at school in the 1980s and I just couldn’t believe a book could set fire to my imagination. I read all of Tolkien’s books after that. It ignited my passion for reading and I began writing my own stories and visiting the library to find more wonderful authors. English lessons became so exciting, as I couldn’t wait to see what book we would study next. Although, for some years, I found many to enjoy, I didn’t come across a book that made me feel as if I couldn’t wait to turn the page and discover what would happen next. Until I met Mr Darcy, of course! Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte are two more books that I found hard to put down as a teenager, as they are so beautifully written.” “I don’t revisit the book often, as it’s an epic read, but I do return to it for inspiration on
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Categories: Book Love and Porridge & Cream.

A Special Offer for you – find a new Contemporary #Romance Series #bargain #ebooks

Don’t you just love that feeling when you find a new author, enjoy their first book then find out there are more to read! Authors I put into that category, whose books fill my bookshelves and Kindle, include PD James, Lucinda Riley, Rory Clements, CJ Sansom, Susan Hill, Philippa Gregory and Philip Pullman. So just in time for Easter I’ve partnered with a small group of authors to offer BARGAIN EBOOKS to you. These are all the first books in a contemporary romance series, so if you like the first there are more books to explore. Simply click the link  and scroll through the introductory novels on offer. Offer ends tomorrow, April 11, so don’t delay! Simple Truths by Michelle Dalton is first in the ‘Lost and Found’ series – having worked in Doctors without Borders, Rochelle Le Roux has seen the best and the worst of humankind and now she just wants to live a quiet life in South Africa. But when her path crosses that of the only man she’s ever loved she is forced to consider that maybe fate has brought her back for a reason. South Africa is a country in strife. But corrupt governments are
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Categories: Book Love.

#BookReview ‘The Clergyman’s Wife’ by @MollyJGreeley #books #JaneAusten

If like me you are fascinated and disturbed by the decision of Charlotte Lucas to marry Mr Collins in Pride and Prejudice, then you will enjoy The Clergyman’s Wife by Molly Greeley. I felt immediately immersed in Charlotte’s world at Hunsford. I won’t summarise the background to this novel on the assumption that all readers will be fans of Pride and Prejudice. Suffice to say, this could so easily have slipped into negative territory, negativity about William Collins and Lady Catherine de Bourgh, but Greeley handles Austen’s characters with respect, taking the heritage of Charlotte’s situation and adding a fresh perspective on her future. We see Mr Collins from a new, sympathetic angle, and are given an insight into Charlotte’s decision to marry him, her family’s position and the limited options available to her. I liked Charlotte extremely, a considered, thoughtful woman, given an impossible choice to make and often put into uncomfortable situations by the crassness of people around her. Charlotte however is not negative, she works out the positive thing to do rather than assign blame. This is a Regency family drama structured around the meaning of love; all kinds of love, for your spouse, your parents and siblings, as a mother, for the people who are
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Categories: Book Love.

Great Opening Paragraph 124… ‘The Camomile Lawn’ #amwriting #FirstPara

“Helena Cuthbertson picked up the crumpled Times by her sleeping husband and went to the flower room to iron it.” ‘The Camomile Lawn’ by Mary Wesley BUY THE BOOK Try one of these 1st paras & discover a new author:- ‘For Whom the Bell Tolls’ by Ernest Hemingway  ‘A Month in the Country’ by JL Carr ‘Back When We Were Grown-Ups’ by Anne Tyler  And if you’d like to tweet a link to THIS post, here’s my suggested tweet: #FirstPara THE CAMOMILE LAWN by Mary Wesley #amwriting https://wp.me/p5gEM4-48b via @SandraDanby
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Categories: Book Love and On Writing.

#BookReview ‘The Ninth Child’ by Sally Magnusson @sallymag1 #books

The Ninth Child by Sally Magnusson is a Scottish historical mystery featuring a doctor’s wife, Queen Victoria, an infrastructure project to bring clean water to Glasgow from the wild and beautiful lochs, and the sithichean (fairies). It is a story of water and the fate of two different women, both expecting their ninth child, and their husbands; one who is ignorant until the end, the other who looks the threat in the eye and shivers. The pregnant women, who have never met, are the Queen and Isabel, wife of Dr Alexander Aird, physician to the water construction project. The Airds live on the remote and basic construction site in a stone cottage called Fairy Knoll, alongside the drilling and tunnelling of the water project. There are two stories here – a historical saga about health and living conditions for the families which struggle both in Glasgow tenements and of the navvies that work on the water project; and a mystical story of a preacher stolen by the fairies in 1692 who returns 167 years later to talk and walk with Isabel Aird. His purpose is not clear but he is egged on by a fairy voice with whom he has made an unearthly deal. The
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Categories: Book Love.